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Andrena wellesleyana (Robertson, 1897)

Properties

Scientific Name: Andrena wellesleyana (Robertson, 1897)

Common Name: Wellesley Miner Bee

Taxonomy

Parandrena wellesleyana Robertson, 1897: 337 [♀, ♂],

     Lectotype ♀, designated by LaBerge and Ribble (1972: 328). USA, Massachusettes, Wellesley, by A.P. Morse [INHS]

 

Taxonomic notes: MCZ has three specimens loaned by A.P. Morse, that are labelled as “syntypes” – MCZ no. 15078, is labelled Wellesley, Mass. Apr. 27, 1892 / A.P. Morse Coll. / Det. 1897 by Robertson. / Loaned by A.P. Morse // Parandrena wellesleyana Rob. ♀ Type [double red border] // Type 15073 // MCZ-ENT 00015073. Strangely, the specimen is recorded in the MCZ database with a valid name of “Andrena bilobus

Robertson (1900: 50) was the first to consider this a species of Andrena Fabricius, 1775. 

Distribution in Canada: Criddle et al. 1924 [MB]; LaBerge and Ribble 1972 [NT, AB, SK, MB, ON]; Sheffield et al. 2014 [AB, SK, MB]; Gibbs et al. 2023 [MB].

 

 

 

References

LaBerge WE, Ribble DW (1972) A revision of the bees of the genus Andrena of the Western Hemisphere. Part V. Gonandrena, Geissandrena, Parandrena, Pelicandrena. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 98 (3): 271‑358. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25078115

Robertson C (1897) North American bees - descriptions and synonyms. Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis 7: 315-356.

References

Hurd PD (1979) Superfamily Apoidea. In: Krombein KV, Hurd Jr PD, Smith DR, Burks BD (Eds) Catalog of Hymenoptera in America North of Mexico. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, 2735 pp.

LaBerge WE, Ribble DW (1972) A revision of the bees of the genus Andrena of the Western Hemisphere. Part V. Gonandrena, Geissandrena, Parandrena, Pelicandrena. Transactions of the American Entomological Society 98(3): 271-358.http://www.jstor.org/stable/25078115

Robertson C (1897) North American bees−descriptions and synonyms. Transactions of the Academy of Sciences of St. Louis 7: 315-356.

Robertson C (1900) Some Illinois bees. Transactions of the Academy of Science of St. Louis 10: 47-55.

Sheffield CS, Frier SD, Dumesh D (2014) The bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea, Apiformes) of the Prairies Ecozone, with comparisons to other grasslands of Canada. In: Giberson DJ, Cárcamo HA (Eds) Arthropods of Canadian Grasslands (Volume 4): Biodiversity and Systematics Part 2. 4. Biological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, 479 pp. [ISBN 978-0-9689321-7-9].https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.3752/9780968932179.ch11

Gibbs J, Hanuschuk E, Miller R, Dubois M, Martini M, Robinson S, Nakagawa P, Sheffield CS, Onuferko T (2023) A checklist of the bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) of Manitoba, Canada. The Canadian Entomologist 155: E3.https://doi.org/10.4039/tce.2022.45

Criddle N, Curran CH, Viereck HL, Buckell ER (1924) The entomological record, 1923. Annual Report of the Entomological Society of Ontario 54: 87-102.

Nelson CJ, Frost CM, Nielsen SE (2021) Narrow anthropogenic linear corridors increase the abundance, diversity, and movement of bees in boreal forests. Forest Ecology and Management 489: 119044 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2021.119044

Sociality: Solitary
Nesting: Ground
Pollen Specialization: Narrow Oligolecty
Wintering Stage: Adult

Crop Preference: Not Available
Non Crop Preference: Salix sp., Prunus virginiana

Distribution: Alberta, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Ontario, Saskatchewan
Ecozone: Boreal Plains, Mixwood Plains, Prairie, Taiga Plains

Distribution Map